Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Abstract art, with wormholes.

On the shore in the rain, among the driftwood, I found this piece of bark. Just the one piece, about six inches long. The colour stood out on the wet beach, a bright orange, looking almost artificial, as if it were painted.

The inner bark of the red alder is reddish brown, and weathers to a bright orange-red.

 A red or orange dye was made from the bark to color red cedar bark and to make fishnets invisible to fish. (Native Plants, PNW)



4 comments:

  1. I didn't know that abouot the invisibility. Thank you.

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  2. Can you amplify on the invisibility bit? Sounds interesting.

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  3. The First Nations people of the West Coast made fishing nets out of stinging nettle fibers (http://www.sfu.museum/time/en/panoramas/beach/dip-netting/58/). The fibers are whitish (http://www.nettlecraft.com/index.php) and may have stood out in the water. I couldn't find anything about the process or the resulting colour of the dyed nets.

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  4. You always find great information so we learn as we enjoy your pictures. - Margy

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